reviews, artists, Bibliography

"THE BALANCE BETWEEN" for Artscope Magazine (Sept/Oct 2012)

"THE BALANCE BETWEEN" for Artscope Magazine (Sept/Oct 2012)

"THE BALANCE BETWEEN: JAMES WILSON RAYEN AND CHERYL CLINTON"

Fountain Street Fine Art
59 Fountain Street
Framingham, Massachusetts
October 11 - November 4, 2012

by Meredith Cutler (for Artscope Magazine)

Article excerpt:

A grid of small, photo-‐transfer canvases in progress on the studio wall dance with botanical ghost marks, both hidden and revealed under layers of acrylic and gel medium. While preparing for her October show with venerable landscape painter James Wilson Rayen, Fountain Street Fine Art (FSFA) gallery co-director Cheryl Clinton simultaneously tends her crop of small works destined for the cooperative gallery's first annual "CSArt" this fall. Shorthand for "Community Supported Art," CSArt functions much as the “CSA” (Community Supported Agriculture) does in the farmers’ marketplace, where a limited number of advance shares are sold to raise “seed money” for a crop. At harvest time, shareholders receive equal portions; in FSFA's case, one original work each by six participating local artists.

Much like farming, CSArt requires many hours of hands-on labor for the participating artists, who have each committed 30 original, signed works to the yield. According to Clinton, the methodical process involved in tending her energetic small works balances well with the slow-cooked, heavily layered canvases she has slated for “The Balance Between,” her double billing with Rayen.

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Image: James Wilson Rayen, "Time, That Thief is Passing", oil on canvas, 48" x 48".

"MARY MINIFIE & ROBERT DOUGLAS HUNTER" for Artscope Magazine (July/August 2012)

"MARY MINIFIE & ROBERT DOUGLAS HUNTER" for Artscope Magazine (July/August 2012)

"REFINED TECHNIQUE: TWO GUILD OF BOSTON ARTIST MEMBERS EXHIBIT AT THE BIRTHPLACE OF JAMES MACNEILL WHISTLER"

Mary Minifie & Robert Douglas Hunter

Whistler House Museum of Art
243 Worthen Street
Lowell, Massachusetts
Through July 21, 2012

by Meredith Cutler (for Artscope Magazine)

Article excerpt:

Let your eyes taste the fruits of two artists' painstaking, life-long pursuit – the fixing of persona, landscape and object still-life on canvas through the teachings of classical realist painting. In an age of mass-market digital imaging and instant gratification, the Guild of Boston Artists steadfastly argue through virtue of their actions (and sheer collectibility) that their "old-school" model can still be relevant today.

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Image: Robert Douglas Hunter, "Arrangement with a Demijohn No. 3", oil.

"ART IN FIBER" for Artscope Magazine (May/June 2012)

"ART IN FIBER" for Artscope Magazine (May/June 2012)

"ART IN FIBER"

Marblehead Arts Association
8 Hooper Street
Marblehead, Massachusetts
May 5 - May 27, 2012

by Meredith Cutler (for Artscope Magazine)

Article excerpt: 

Fans of fiber art have reason to head to Boston's North Shore this May. Celebrating their 90th anniversary this year, the Marblehead Arts Association presents "Art in Fiber" at their galleries in the restored King Hooper Mansion.

Curated by Sandra Golbert, Deborah Greel and Claudia Kaufman, the exhibit showcases the varied media recognized under the large umbrella of fiber art through an eclectic array of work by both regional and internationally recognized artists.

The ancient utilitarian form of the basket serves as muse for Brooklyn- based artist Charlotte Thorp, who transforms her vessels from steadfastly functional to purely sculptural using twined cords of waxed linen, Japanese paper and leather.

Brilliantly surfaced works in felt and silk by mathematician-cum-fiber-artist Larry Schulte are included, as are optically charged, geometric weavings by Newton, Mass.-based fiber artist Dora Hsuing.

Paper, with its mashed and intertwined fibrous DNA, holds court in book-based art by Carole P. Kunstadt. Her ongoing "Sacred Poem" series de- and re- constructs the 1844 and 1849 editions of the sacred text "Parish Psalmody." Kunstadt fringes, stitches, knots and even gilds papers from the antique paper tomes to make beautiful art objects layered with meaning.

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Image: Charlotte Thorp, "Red Well", hand-spun paper, waxed linen thread, leather cord, 10" x 10" x 6".

"CARIBIANA: SANDRA GOLBERT" for Artscope Magazine (May/June 2012)

"CARIBIANA: SANDRA GOLBERT" for Artscope Magazine (May/June 2012)

"CARIBIANA: TROPICAL SIGHTS AND COLORS BY SANDRA GOLBERT"

The Hess Gallery at Pine Manor College
400 Heath Street
Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts
March 28 - August 1, 2012

by Meredith Cutler (for Artscope Magazine)

Article excerpt:

Invisible currents of air created by visitors entering the Hess Gallery are revealed as Sandra Golbert's "Sun Room" installation ripples a welcome. Suspended just beyond the entry gate, this curtain of hand-painted silk ribbons lights up the space with a gradient of sunset hues, confronting every entrant with subtle movement.

"Reef," a similarly constructed piece of suspended fabric elements, is the keystone of the fiber arts show "Caribiana: Tropical Sights and Colors by Sandra Golbert" at the Hess Gallery, located in Pine Manor College’s Annenberg Library. A cascade of hand-painted silk crepe de chine and organza slowly turning in the library’s atrium, "Reef" has only been on display once before, in a church. Its indigo-to-turquoise hues conjure at once the celestial and the nautical realms. Golbert envisioned each component as a floating painting, working with French cold-water dyes and salt to achieve brilliantly speckled, cooling washes of color.

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Image: Sandra Golbert, "Barnacles" (detail), hand-embroidered silk in barnacle-shaped cones, 18" x 6" x 2".

"THE PROVIDENCE ART CLUB" for Artscope Magazine (Mar/Apr 2012)

"THE PROVIDENCE ART CLUB" for Artscope Magazine (Mar/Apr 2012)

"THE PROVIDENCE ART CLUB"

Providence Art Club
11 Thomas Street
Providence, Rhode Island

by Meredith Cutler (for Artscope Magazine)

Article excerpt: 

I’m on a guided tour of the Providence Art Club, and I’m lost. Guests “are always getting lost in here” quips Gallery Coordinator Kristin Grimm, as she shepherds me through the dark hallway of a period decorated, 18th century foyer leading to a soaring skylight. The back of the 1789 Seril Dodge House forms one wall of the corridor. I blink at the surreal perspective of the historic house’s wooden siding, now an interior wall, feeling quite like Alice through the looking glass. Welcome to The Club.

Boasting a proximity to breathtaking waterfront views ranging from Great Gatsby-esque to post-industrial, along with a critical mass of higher education institutions including the Rhode Island School of Design, Providence has long drawn both practitioners and lovers of the arts and letters to its steep-streeted bosom. It’s a fit home for the Providence Art Club, one of the oldest known art clubs in the country — second to New York’s Salmagundi, but the first to boast six women and an African American among its founding members.

Founded "for art culture" in 1880 by a group of 16 professional artists, amateurs and art collectors to stimulate the appreciation of art in their growing community, the Providence Art Club today has over 600 members, including practicing artists and the art lovers that keep the scene alive.

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Image: Providence Art Club, exterior view.

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